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These are some of the key questions addressed in this module which aims to introduce students to the basic anatomy of the crime problem. The pay remains the same for both group lessons and one on one. Leave a Reply Cancel reply Your email address will not be published. You set your own prices which are on a per minute basis. Also, if it becomes clear that are unable to finish your degree within the determined amount of time two academic years for your degree, you would lose the scholarship immediately. If I am not being selected, will I be notified?

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We offer several types of fee reduction through our scholarships and bursaries. Find the full list and other useful information on our scholarships page. Senior Lecturer in Criminology Helen Easton has been working with charities in Glasgow to establish best practice for helping women to exit prostitution. Students can prepare themselves for the course by following the news - quality newspapers, good TV news bulletins, Radio 4 news etc - particularly news about crime politics of crime as well as actual crime stories.

Overview Crime complex You will examine how complex interactions between the state, the offender, the victim and the public lead particular acts to be framed as crimes while others are not. Modules This course provides you with lots of transferable skills, as well as practical experience, which can be invaluable when it comes to starting your career.

Methods of assessment for course overall: Year 1 Semester 1 Global issues in sociology This module provides students with a grounding in key issues in contemporary society, with a particular emphasis on the societal effects of globalization.

These effects are dynamic and global in nature and impact on the key themes addressed in the module. An important focus throughout the module is on how inequalities are reinforced but may be challenged via active citizenship and civic engagement around social justice issues.

Introduction to the criminal justice system This module introduces students to the different levels, agencies and operation of the criminal justice system. It presents the main institutions and provides an overview of the procedures and policies related to the contemporary criminal justice system and punishment of offenders.

The module introduces a number of key issues and debates in relation to the effectiveness of the criminal justice system. Deconstructing the crime problem What is crime?

How and to what extent is the crime problem dispersed throughout contemporary society? What do we know about current levels of crime in the UK and how do these compare historically? These are some of the key questions addressed in this module which aims to introduce students to the basic anatomy of the crime problem.

In addition to addressing specific questions concerning trends in different types of crime and social distribution of crime across society, its main aim is to encourage students to think about these issues in terms of broader social trends and relations.

Semester 2 Understanding crime: We will examine the conceptual and practical differences between these schools and show how their differences have resulted in very different definitions of crime, types of research and governmental policy. We will also see how these different theories have shaped the criminal justice system of different societies.

We will do all this within the broad historical context of the development of criminology. Liberty against the Law: It explores the Robin Hood myth to encourage students to question the assumption of legal neutrality, widely accepted as absent in pre-modern societies but characteristic of the modern rule of law. Year 2 Semester 1 Understanding punishment: The module presents the juridical perspectives and rationales of punishment, historical and sociological explanations of punishment.

Optional modules Behind bars: The module also explores the broader historical, social, political, and economic context of the modern prison and the ideology of imprisonment, including its representation in popular media. Issues in criminal justice history This module provides a framework for examining the development of the criminal justice system and the general construction of the crime problem in the period from s until the s.

It blends a discussion of institutional development with a socio-historical analysis of changing problems of crime. By examining criminological issues within a specific political, historical and intellectual context this module provides a valuable underpinning for a range of modules in the Criminology Degree programme in general and on the topics of policing, prisons, gender and crime, and youth crime in particular.

Policing and society The module will seek to create a critical understanding of historical, social and contemporary problems and debates in the development of modern policing, with specific reference to England and Wales. Within this framework a range of theoretical and practical topics will be addressed, including, legitimacy, accountability and representation, in relation to significant policies and programs. An analysis of police culture and ideology, in the context of human rights, democracy, and governance, will be undertaken as part of this.

Also discussed will be the impact upon police strategies and practices of globalisation, consumerism, politicisation, and the New Public Management. Semester 2 Researching crime, deviance and justice This module introduces students to key concepts, methods and techniques used in criminological research.

Students learn how to evaluate the methodological choices of researchers and to conduct their own criminological research. Students are introduced to both qualitative methods in the first half and quantitative methods in the second half.

Within each half the module focuses on evaluative criteria e. It gives particular attention to the evolution of youth justice policies and examines current literature in relation to the strengths and limitations of the contemporary youth justice system. Using theory to inform practice, students will develop their approaches to identifying and reducing barriers, with the aim of developing inclusive practice for all pupils in an educational setting.

Using both historical and contemporary examples the course will discuss the following themes: Through these themes the course will explore how social difference and criminalisation interact to produce the city. Work placement This module provides an opportunity for students to work in settings related to their studies and, more generally, gain meaningful workplace experience in which to apply their social scientific learning.

It will also reinforce their studies through the application and integration of relevant workplace experience into the academic context. Voluntary and community sector organisations, charities and most political organisations are particularly suitable for work placements, although much can also be learned from placements in commercial settings. Students are required to consult with the module coordinator to identify an appropriate organisation in which to carry out their work placement.

Year 3 Semester 1 Gender, crime and justice The relationship between men, masculinity and crime; and women, femininity and crime has assumed increasing visibility and political significance within both criminology and the public arena.

An understanding of both masculinities and femininities is central to this module. Drawing on feminist perspectives in criminological theory as well as more mainstream theoretical accounts, this module evaluates the evidence, which indicates that patterns of offending, victimisation and the workings of the main criminal justice agencies are gendered. The module also transgresses traditional debates in this area by considering a human rights perspective for the study of gender and crime.

Research project This level six double module covers two semesters and consists of the research for and completion of an academic project with a word limit.

Each student chooses a subject relevant to the study of Sociology or Criminology in which they wish to specialize, and then uses the skills and knowledge that they have accumulated and developed through modules studied at previous levels to undertake and complete the project. During the whole process, from choice of subject to final submission, each student will have the support and guidance of a supervisor allocated for this purpose.

Optional modules Hate crime This module provides students with a grounding in key concepts and debates surrounding the problem of hate crime. Students will explore the nature and extent of different forms of hate crime including racist, religious, homophobic and disablist hate crime.

The motivations of perpetrators of hate crime will be considered as well as the impact that hate crime has on victims. This module will also explore the policing of hate crime and the development of key legislation in the United Kingdom.

Race, culture and identity This module addresses the centrality of race and ethnicity including whiteness to social relations. It provides an analysis of race and ethnicity within a changing scholarship and within their historical, cultural, political and theoretical contexts. The complexities of analysing race, gender and sexuality are applied to representations in cultural forms, such as media and film.

The module also demonstrates how the concepts covered have been influential in shaping public policy. Semester 2 Research project Contemporary criminology This module allows students to examine, in depth, contemporary and specific areas of criminological debate and theory. The module adopts a flexible design in response to current developments in the field of criminology and in the context of current social and political problems.

Students will be encouraged to critically explore topics within the area and apply them to wider criminological debate and theory. Optional modules Crimes of the powerful: It examines the problems involved in conceptualising state crimes and human rights and looks at contemporary crimes against humanity, including in the area of environmental rights. The module also explores the problems involved in regulating and controlling state crime and human rights atrocities in which states and state officials play a key role.

The critical engagement with globalization provides a framework within which students explore significant contemporary debates and developments.

Genocide and crimes against humanity This module explores the history of genocide and crimes against humanity in the twentieth century and beyond. It analyses the dynamics of genocide and crimes against humanity in order to shed light upon their origins, characteristics and consequences.

Media, crime and culture This module will explore the relationship between media, crime, culture and criminal justice. The representation of crime in the news media will be critically explored. Students will be able to show understanding of the significance of popular culture representations of crime and criminal justice within public, political and cultural discourse.

Employability Career opportunities Students take part in voluntary work in the police service, the prison service, legal advice, victim support, domestic violence and child abuse agencies, youth offending and youth mentoring schemes. Career roles One popular role is as a probation officer working with offenders before, during and after they are sentenced. National Careers Service The police service also offers a wide variety of long-term opportunities providing a two-year probationary period is completed.

BBC News If you are willing to take further training, then social work is another alternative. How does the criminal mind work? In a world increasingly fascinated by the nature of crime and justice, this degree offers a contemporary view of crime and criminal justice within the context of the scientific study of human thought and behaviour.

You'll have the opportunity to refine your cognitive, analytical, critical, and research skills, and to translate these into research practice in the field of criminology and psychology.

Students take part in voluntary work in the police service, the prison service, legal advice, victim support, domestic violence and child abuse agencies, youth offending and youth mentoring schemes. Many prefer to work for the police or criminal justice services, where there are countless opportunities to help the community with plenty of room for specialisation.

A humanities degree also has the real advantage of opening up careers in a number of professions such as teaching, social work, administration and higher level education. Other graduates have forged exciting careers in research, public relations, advertising, retail, management and media-related work. One popular role is as a probation officer working with offenders before, during and after they are sentenced.

Possessing a great deal of patience, strong spoken communication skills and a non-judgemental attitude, a probation officer can be very rewarding work. The police service also offers a wide variety of long-term opportunities providing a two-year probationary period is completed.

If you are willing to take further training, then social work is another alternative. Social Workers provide support and assistance to many individuals, families and groups, from the homeless to people with learning and physical disabilities.

The academic strength of our programmes has allowed many graduates to continue onto postgraduate degrees and academic research. We offer a number of applied postgraduate courses heavily linked to the Department's nationally and internationally recognised research activities. At LSBU, we want to set you up for a successful career.

Our Student Enterprise team can also help you start your own business and develop valuable entrepreneurial skills. In keeping with our applied approach to social and policy studies, this department has a strong voluntary work placement scheme.

Students can volunteer within the police and prison services, as well as with legal advice, victim support, domestic violence and child abuse agencies. Through these, students contribute to real world situations linked to their subject of interest.

In many cases, students maintain a relationship with the organisation they volunteer for. Placements ground a student's experience, provide confidence and bolster a CV immeasurably.

She teaches Criminology, Sociology and Political Science, with particular interest in the criminalisation of political movements, political violence, terrorism, victims. Edwin is a Lecturer in the Social Sciences Division, teaching and conducting research in politics and criminology. Dr Shaminder Takhar is Associate Professor in Sociology specialising in race, gender, sexuality and social justice. She is the research ethics co-ordinator for the School of Law and Social Sciences.

Year 1 class contact time is typically 9 hours per week plus individual tutorial and independent study. All modules are assessed by a combination of coursework, essays, exams, presentations, reports, case-studies, reviews and final year dissertation.

You will be taught by research-active academics whose work is internationally recognised and informs the course curriculum. You'll be encouraged to undertake your own research, from which you'll gain invaluable experience of social scientific research methods.

Staff are actively engaged in criminological research. On 13th September, Helen Easton, Senior Lecturer in Criminology, hosted a conference with international guest speakers titled "Overcoming the Stalemate: The role of your tutor is to be your primary contact for academic and professional development support. Your tutor will support you to get the most of your time at LSBU, providing advice and signposting to other sources of support in the University.

They should be the first person at the university that you speak to if you are having any difficulties that are affecting your work. These could be academic, financial, health-related or another type of problem.

You will have appointments with your personal academic tutor at least three times a year for 15 minutes throughout your course. You can contact your tutor for additional support by email or sign up for an appointment slots advertised outside your tutor's office. We welcome qualifications from around the world. English language qualifications for international students: IELTS score of 6.

Visit UCAS for guidance on the tariff. UCAS is the organisation responsible for managing applications to higher education courses in the UK. For part-time courses, you can apply directly to the University.

For more details on how to apply full-time and part-time see our how to apply page. Once we have made you an offer, you can apply for accommodation.

That means we can guarantee you options to suit all budgets, with clear tenancy agreements and all-inclusive rents that include insurance for your personal belongings, internet access in each bedroom and on-site laundry facilities.

Read more about applying for accommodation at LSBU. You don't need to wait for a confirmed place on a course to start applying for student finance. Read how to pay your fees as an undergraduate student. Fees are shown for new entrants to courses, for each individual year of a course, together with the total fee for all the years of a course. Queries regarding fees should be directed to the Fees and Bursaries Team on: The University reserves the right to increase its fees in line with changes to legislation, regulation and any government guidance or decisions.

The fees for international students are reviewed annually and the University reserves the right to increase the tuition fees in line with the RPIX measure of inflation up to 4 per cent. We offer several types of fee reduction through our scholarships and bursaries. Find the full list and other useful information on our scholarships page. Senior Lecturer in Criminology Helen Easton has been working with charities in Glasgow to establish best practice for helping women to exit prostitution.

You can start preparing for the course by following the news - quality newspapers, good TV news bulletins, Radio 4 news etc - particularly news about crime politics of crime as well as actual crime stories.

Overview Partners in crime Why do people commit crimes? Modules You'll have the opportunity to refine your cognitive, analytical, critical, and research skills, and to translate these into research practice in the field of criminology and psychology. Year 1 Semester 1 Introducing psychological approaches This module will introduce you to the study of psychology, first by discussing its conceptual underpinnings and historical development, then topics related to living in the world as biological, learning and feeling beings.

The first part of the module will focus on the philosophical foundations of psychology, its status as a science and current identity, while the second part will deal with evolutionary theory and the relationship of the brain to behaviour.

The third part will consider learning, and the fourth will analyse emotions from biological, psychological and social perspectives.

The module will provides you with the knowledge-base necessary for advanced study at Level 5, and also the development of skills relating to factual learning, i.

This module will help you develop skills relating to MCQ assessments. Introduction to the criminal justice system This module introduces students to the different levels, agencies and operation of the criminal justice system.

It presents the main institutions and provides an overview of the procedures and policies related to the contemporary criminal justice system and punishment of offenders. The module introduces a number of key issues and debates in relation to the effectiveness of the criminal justice system. Deconstructing the crime problem What is crime? How and to what extent is the crime problem dispersed throughout contemporary society?

What do we know about current levels of crime in the UK and how do these compare historically? These are some of the key questions addressed in this module which aims to introduce students to the basic anatomy of the crime problem. In addition to addressing specific questions concerning trends in different types of crime and social distribution of crime across society, its main aim is to encourage students to think about these issues in terms of broader social trends and relations.

Semester 2 Issues in crime This module presents students with a range of distinct contemporary criminological issues and debates. It includes a range of topics and examines how fears and concerns about crime and the criminal justice system are related to issues such as governance, social exclusion and racial inequality.

The module also enables students to explore varying explanations of crimes and crime control strategies. Exploring psychological approaches This module introduces topics related to living in the world as a developing, thinking, social and individual being.

Topics will include memory, perception, attention, cognitive development, interpersonal behaviour, group behaviour, intelligence, personality and aspects of atypical behaviour.

Study in each of these areas will provide you with a framework for advanced study at Level 5. In addition to knowledge, the module will provide you with the opportunity to develop skills relating to accessing, assimilating and communicating information, and it will introduce you to a variety of assessment techniques that you'll encounter on the course. We will examine the conceptual and practical differences between these schools and show how their differences have resulted in very different definitions of crime, types of research and governmental policy.

We will also see how these different theories have shaped the criminal justice system of different societies. We will do all this within the broad historical context of the development of criminology. Year 2 Semester 1 Understanding punishment: The module presents the juridical perspectives and rationales of punishment, historical and sociological explanations of punishment. The psychology of feelings This module will provide you with the opportunity to explore the interdependence between feelings and human behaviour.

The module is organised into three distinct themes, relationships, mood and sensations. Two introductory sessions will be used to recap and consolidate material at Level 4 and provide a knowledge base upon which the rest of the module will build. Then, within each theme a range of topics will be explored, drawing on theory and research from biological, developmental, evolutionary, cross-cultural, cognitive and atypical psychology.

Individual differences will be a key perspective in this module. Optional modules Behind bars: The module also explores the broader historical, social, political, and economic context of the modern prison and the ideology of imprisonment, including its representation in popular media. Issues in criminal justice history This module provides a framework for examining the development of the criminal justice system and the general construction of the crime problem in the period from s until the s.

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