Expert Insight Poker Tip: The Value of Suited Cards

Imagine a struggling business owner hiring a famed economist to talk through her problems directly. Right now, such transactions are rare precisely because they are so cumbersome. The idea makes more sense, and is more democratic, than you might think. Good players often offered lessons on message boards, and he decided to join in, charging hundreds of dollars per hour to coach ambitious amateurs via Skype. A chef preparing a dinner party in a stranger's kitchen. If I dont hit, fine, then I only lost the blinds. I hear a lot of people talk about how you can play this type of hand like small pp and hope you catch a flop, or the monster straight flush draw.

Expert Insight Poker Tip: Playing Small Pocket Pairs

Expert Insight Poker Tip: Knowing the Odds and Percentages

And the reason for that is escalating blinds and antes. That tip isnt that good. I mostly play Ace anything suited only because of its suitedness. And of course I only play for the flush. If I dont hit, fine, then I only lost the blinds. You have to play Axs like small pocket pairs.

If you dont hit anything get away and if you hit, take their chips. The probabilities shown in this video are only relevant when you want to go allin with your suited cards, and that is of course nonsense. Before the flop, things like K2s are an insta-fold in most situations, but so many people overplay hands like that. Something like Q6 suited is about as good as Q7 offsuit, and J5 suited is about equal to J6 off suit. In other words, useless.

A5 clubs that are worth limping in with, because of nut flush possibilities. What is missing here. Expert Insight is the brainchild of Brandon Adams, a Ph. Prospective customers go to a website and peruse the many experts available—mostly economists, poker and chess players, and sports coaches, along with the occasional relationship expert or writer. Most list their per-hour rates, though a few require customers to call to request them. Customers select an hour or two from their chosen expert's schedule, and then pay online.

They receive the expert's proprietary email address for correspondence before the appointment. Then, when the time comes, they log onto a Skype-type video chat system and ask away for the purchased hour. Prices vary significantly by level of expertise, by field, and by fame. Currently, experts keep 70 percent of the per-hour fee. Want to have a professional chess player teach you a few moves? Want to know what Nobel laureate in economics Gary Becker thinks of the renminbi, U.

Freakonomics author and economist Steven Levitt elected not to list his hourly rate and has yet to sell an appointment. I would have to charge a really high price to make it worth my time. Is Expert Insight worth your time?

The idea makes more sense, and is more democratic, than you might think. You have probably already paid outrageous sums of money to attend a college or graduate school where the putative point is access to some of these very same minds.

Yet at a university, you're subject to a set curriculum, limited to the available professors, and have to share their time with all the other students. Trade groups and corporations also pay such experts enormous sums to advise and speak. Individuals cannot ordinarily do that. Given how much we already pay for expertise, and how inefficiently we do it, is it really crazy to think that there's a market for expertise-for-cash transactions that are transparent, simple, and relatively effortless?

Imagine a struggling business owner hiring a famed economist to talk through her problems directly. Or a tennis enthusiast who doesn't have the time or money to attend a fancy camp forking over a few hundred bucks to get a former pro to watch a video of his serve and offer tips. Right now, such transactions are rare precisely because they are so cumbersome. Adams believes that if they cease being cumbersome, they will also cease to be rare. He recognized the potential of the expertise-for-cash market, and the barriers to it, while surfing around online poker forums.

Good players often offered lessons on message boards, and he decided to join in, charging hundreds of dollars per hour to coach ambitious amateurs via Skype.

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